Guide StoryTeller Tymes

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Award-winning author, storyteller and owner of Toronto bookstore, A Different Booklist, Itah Sadu shares the rich oral traditions of the Caribbean, Africa and North America with students and teachers. Her stories, workshops and keynotes often address issues of racism and equity as well as demonstrating the wealth of knowledge, experience and wisdom gained from oral traditional cultures of the African Diaspora. Judy Caulfield has been telling stories for over three decades. From school settings, to libraries, to festivals, and to informal song and story circles, Judy delights in sharing and exploring stories with different audiences.

Born in Tohoku, the northeast of Japan, Koko Kikuchi has been involved in Katari almost since its inception. He specializes in the folktales of his native region of Iwate, northern Japan. Aisha Masaoka is currently running her own home daycare. She is a mother to a sweet 5-year-old boy and 2-and-a-half-year-old girl.


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She recently moved to Listowel, Onario and is enjoying the small town life. Yusuke Tanaka is a veteran translator, writer, and director of the Katari since Noriko Yamamoto is a professional dancer, mime, silent storyteller, and visual artist. Since moving to Toronto from Tokyo in , Noriko has added Nia to her repertoire. She performs regularly at schools, libraries, festivals, and at various other events. She lived in Osaka for a year and a half and loves to share, hear stories, and travel back into memories of Japan and Asia. Rui Umezawa is a Toronto writer and storyteller. His past participation in Katari inspired his latest publication, Strange Tales Afar: Tales of the Supernatural from Old Japan.

She loves traditional wisdom tales and has a passion for history, particularly of early Canada. She tells in schools, churches and community settings, with a fondness for child and family audiences. Mariposa in the Schools is a non-profit organization that sends performers into schools, libraries, and community settings. Diane Bosman is a long-time Toronto storyteller with roots in Alberta. She tells amusing and enchanting tales from around the world. Donna Dudinsky tells old tales and sings old songs to the young at heart.

He has appeared in several Toronto Festivals. Meryl Arbing has been involved in ballad singing for even longer than his storytelling. His grandmother and great aunt were singers on Prince Edward Island and several of his songs he learned directly from them. Currently a member of the Ballad Project, he has a fine repertoire of traditional songs. Karen Kaplan is a lifelong singer deeply engaged in ballad singing. She is particularly interested in the ballads that are not often heard and finds that the long ones can be the most interesting of all.

She sang for many years as part of the trio Sweet Tyme and is a member of the Ballad Project. She has collaborated with cross-discipline dance innovators many of whom thread text into their work, to include: Upcoming projects include the creation of a talking dance work for differently abled populations: Moyo Mutamba is a multi-disciplinary artist, Zimbabwean cultural worker, teacher and researcher. He specializes in mbira music, Zimbabwean traditional dancing and folk storytelling.

His music is centered around Mbira, a percussive lamellaphone from Zimbabwe. His son Kuda is an accomplished mbira player in his own right, carrying on the family tradition. Kuda photo by Jacob Yashinsky-Zavitz. Nathalie Vachon has been delighting audiences at festivals, schools, libraries, workshops and corporate events for over 20 years. She tells folktales, fairy tales, original stories and songs; taking the listener on a journey full of vibrant images, wisdom, witty wordplay, heart and humour.

Ross Lynde has been performing across Canada and around the world for nearly 20 years with Juno-nominated a cappella quartet Cadence. Eden studied storytelling in New York with Diane Wolkstein. Rico Rodriguez is a storyteller, and a percussionist. He tells folktales, fairytales, fables and legends from the rich and diverse Latino and Hispanic cultures. He tells in Spanish, English and in Spanglish. His storytelling presentation is energetic and highly participatory.

Trinidad born author and storyteller Rita Cox has received the Order of Canada for her active role in promoting storytelling, multicultural education and literacy. Rita opens the world of books to her listeners by weaving together the oral and written word, providing the tools for lifelong love of reading and telling. She is the founder and host of High Stakes Storytelling: As a keynote speaker and storyteller, Sandra uses the telling of stories as a vehicle for positive social change.

Sashoya Shoya Oya is an artist who channels her voice through the medium of oral — storytelling within the realm of folklore traditions. Solar Stage was founded in , and has been a cultural destination for Toronto families for over forty years. We create award-winning, progressive, original, Canadian, family theatre with a focus on inclusive, diverse, optimistic and inspirational storytelling. We follow a simple philosophy with a complex execution: Our season includes some of your all-time favourites like Jillian Jiggs, Memorable Munsch, and more!

This is our first collaboration with the Toronto Storytelling Festival.

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There are some stories that we get really good at telling, we tell them to our friends, our coworkers, and even strangers at parties. We tell them because they are a part of us, and in doing so they build up our sense of self. These truths are just as much a part of who we are, despite being erased from our day-to-day conversation. Swooping down from the vast Zimbabwean plains, Tichaona Maredza , a guitar in one hand, a drum in the other and an mbira in his teeth, arrived in Toronto in Filiz Dogan curates and hosts a program of shoe stories told by alumni of The Shoe Projet co-produced with the Shoe Project.

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Filiz Dogan is from Istanbul, Turkey. She established a career as a psychologist until moving to Canada. She works as a psychotherapist and runs a program that offers mental health service to newcomers. Samia Hossain likes to design and build furniture. When she is not searching for happiness elsewhere, she and her daughter can be found playing barefooted in the mud. Yemi Stephanie Laotan is a blogger and mother of twins who immigrated to Canada from Nigeria, after studying in Hungary and Ireland.

She is currently a Communication Officer with the Ontario government.

She has published several articles for both Spanish and English publications. Torontonians know that our Toronto Public Library is the greatest in the world. It has been a home for excellent storytelling since it began. Every Friday night since , storytellers and listeners have been gathering in downtown Toronto for an open evening of oral stories.

Each Friday night is unique, and everyone is welcome to come and listen, come and tell. On these nights, we come as listeners and as tellers: You might hear traditional tales, stories of personal experience, literary stories, original stories, ballads, or episodes from history, all told through the human voice. Before becoming a storyteller and author, Aubrey Davis worked as a logger, farmer, salesman and teacher.

As a young man he traveled across Europe and North Africa where he discovered traditional Teaching-Stories. Later Aubrey began to tell these tales at a weekly gathering in Toronto; then in nursing homes, festivals, jails and on national radio and television. For over 30 years Aubrey has told stories to people of all ages. He has performed and conducted workshops across Canada and the US. Her stories, workshops and keynotes often address issues of racism and equity as well as demonstrating the wealth of knowledge, experience and wisdom gained from oral traditional cultures of the African Diaspora.

Judy Caulfield has been telling stories for over three decades. From school settings, to libraries, to festivals, and to informal song and story circles, Judy delights in sharing and exploring stories with different audiences. Born in Tohoku, the northeast of Japan, Koko Kikuchi has been involved in Katari almost since its inception. He specializes in the folktales of his native region of Iwate, northern Japan. Aisha Masaoka is currently running her own home daycare. She is a mother to a sweet 5-year-old boy and 2-and-a-half-year-old girl. She recently moved to Listowel, Onario and is enjoying the small town life.

Yusuke Tanaka is a veteran translator, writer, and director of the Katari since Noriko Yamamoto is a professional dancer, mime, silent storyteller, and visual artist. Since moving to Toronto from Tokyo in , Noriko has added Nia to her repertoire. She performs regularly at schools, libraries, festivals, and at various other events.


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She lived in Osaka for a year and a half and loves to share, hear stories, and travel back into memories of Japan and Asia. Rui Umezawa is a Toronto writer and storyteller.

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His past participation in Katari inspired his latest publication, Strange Tales Afar: Tales of the Supernatural from Old Japan. She loves traditional wisdom tales and has a passion for history, particularly of early Canada. She tells in schools, churches and community settings, with a fondness for child and family audiences. Mariposa in the Schools is a non-profit organization that sends performers into schools, libraries, and community settings.

Diane Bosman is a long-time Toronto storyteller with roots in Alberta. She tells amusing and enchanting tales from around the world. Donna Dudinsky tells old tales and sings old songs to the young at heart. He has appeared in several Toronto Festivals. Meryl Arbing has been involved in ballad singing for even longer than his storytelling. His grandmother and great aunt were singers on Prince Edward Island and several of his songs he learned directly from them.

Currently a member of the Ballad Project, he has a fine repertoire of traditional songs. Karen Kaplan is a lifelong singer deeply engaged in ballad singing. She is particularly interested in the ballads that are not often heard and finds that the long ones can be the most interesting of all. She sang for many years as part of the trio Sweet Tyme and is a member of the Ballad Project. She has collaborated with cross-discipline dance innovators many of whom thread text into their work, to include: Upcoming projects include the creation of a talking dance work for differently abled populations: Moyo Mutamba is a multi-disciplinary artist, Zimbabwean cultural worker, teacher and researcher.

He specializes in mbira music, Zimbabwean traditional dancing and folk storytelling. His music is centered around Mbira, a percussive lamellaphone from Zimbabwe. His son Kuda is an accomplished mbira player in his own right, carrying on the family tradition. Kuda photo by Jacob Yashinsky-Zavitz. Nathalie Vachon has been delighting audiences at festivals, schools, libraries, workshops and corporate events for over 20 years.

She tells folktales, fairy tales, original stories and songs; taking the listener on a journey full of vibrant images, wisdom, witty wordplay, heart and humour. Ross Lynde has been performing across Canada and around the world for nearly 20 years with Juno-nominated a cappella quartet Cadence. Eden studied storytelling in New York with Diane Wolkstein. Rico Rodriguez is a storyteller, and a percussionist.

What is the job of a storyteller? | Writing the World, the Official Website of Kay Kenyon

He tells folktales, fairytales, fables and legends from the rich and diverse Latino and Hispanic cultures. He tells in Spanish, English and in Spanglish. His storytelling presentation is energetic and highly participatory. Trinidad born author and storyteller Rita Cox has received the Order of Canada for her active role in promoting storytelling, multicultural education and literacy. Rita opens the world of books to her listeners by weaving together the oral and written word, providing the tools for lifelong love of reading and telling.

She is the founder and host of High Stakes Storytelling: As a keynote speaker and storyteller, Sandra uses the telling of stories as a vehicle for positive social change. Sashoya Shoya Oya is an artist who channels her voice through the medium of oral — storytelling within the realm of folklore traditions. Solar Stage was founded in , and has been a cultural destination for Toronto families for over forty years. We create award-winning, progressive, original, Canadian, family theatre with a focus on inclusive, diverse, optimistic and inspirational storytelling.

We follow a simple philosophy with a complex execution: Our season includes some of your all-time favourites like Jillian Jiggs, Memorable Munsch, and more! This is our first collaboration with the Toronto Storytelling Festival. There are some stories that we get really good at telling, we tell them to our friends, our coworkers, and even strangers at parties.

We tell them because they are a part of us, and in doing so they build up our sense of self. These truths are just as much a part of who we are, despite being erased from our day-to-day conversation. Swooping down from the vast Zimbabwean plains, Tichaona Maredza , a guitar in one hand, a drum in the other and an mbira in his teeth, arrived in Toronto in Filiz Dogan curates and hosts a program of shoe stories told by alumni of The Shoe Projet co-produced with the Shoe Project. Filiz Dogan is from Istanbul, Turkey. She established a career as a psychologist until moving to Canada. She works as a psychotherapist and runs a program that offers mental health service to newcomers.

Samia Hossain likes to design and build furniture. When she is not searching for happiness elsewhere, she and her daughter can be found playing barefooted in the mud. Yemi Stephanie Laotan is a blogger and mother of twins who immigrated to Canada from Nigeria, after studying in Hungary and Ireland. She is currently a Communication Officer with the Ontario government. She has published several articles for both Spanish and English publications. Torontonians know that our Toronto Public Library is the greatest in the world.

It has been a home for excellent storytelling since it began. Every Friday night since , storytellers and listeners have been gathering in downtown Toronto for an open evening of oral stories. Each Friday night is unique, and everyone is welcome to come and listen, come and tell. On these nights, we come as listeners and as tellers: You might hear traditional tales, stories of personal experience, literary stories, original stories, ballads, or episodes from history, all told through the human voice. Before becoming a storyteller and author, Aubrey Davis worked as a logger, farmer, salesman and teacher.

As a young man he traveled across Europe and North Africa where he discovered traditional Teaching-Stories. Later Aubrey began to tell these tales at a weekly gathering in Toronto; then in nursing homes, festivals, jails and on national radio and television. For over 30 years Aubrey has told stories to people of all ages. He has performed and conducted workshops across Canada and the US.

A retired teacher, for 17 years he taught an oral language program to primary and special needs students. Even today some storytellers who work in the medium of comic books sometimes discard words from their panels. On the subject of silent films, many of them were made up on the spot — Charlie Chaplin worked this way.

Was he a writer? I would call him a storyteller. Okay, so what, you may ask. The difference is that calling yourself a writer does not tell you what to do; calling yourself a storyteller gives you a direction — a mission. They write pages upon pages of beautiful sentences about colorful characters. Or they write descriptions of exotic places. And they may do these things masterfully. Yet somehow they can never finish that novel or screenplay or whatever. Or, if they do finish, the material just lies flat somehow — it fails to move readers or agents or publishers.

As a child I was interested in storytelling, but was a poor speller. What I found out was that teachers cared very little about the content of my writing, but a great deal about my misspellings. I became very familiar with red pen markings on my papers.

What I did not know was that I was dyslexic. The students who could spell were the golden children. It did not matter that they had no knack for telling interesting stories. The late Stephen J. Cannell, creator of more than 40 shows including the hit The Rockford Files , author of several best-selling novels, had terrible dyslexia. I could mention more writers with such cognitive issues, but my point is that these guys were much better storytellers than spellers or wordsmiths.

Storytelling is a noble craft that has been with us since before we had an alphabet. We should embrace it.

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In fact, plot and storytelling are often seen as a lesser form of writing. Those writers who sell millions of books are often called bad writers by the wordsmiths. But what these best-selling people are often good at is getting folks to turn pages, or tune into their television shows, or buy movie tickets.