e-book Chosen Soldier: The Making of a Special Forces Warrior

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A poorly written history book can be a little tough to read. Having to record so much information and so many facts can leave a book a little dry if the author does not have the ability to keep an interesting narrative going throughout. Couch has mastered this narrative version of history writing and Chosen Soldier has a very easy to read flow.

Because he has broken the specialist training into its own sections there are times when he goes into detail about the same event nearly verbatim in multiple chapters. He also seems to have lost some objectivity when writing this book. He is himself a character in his own books and recounts his side of interactions with soldiers as much as their interactions among each other. Doing this a few times might have its charms but he pushes this a little too far and his imposing himself in the story happens a little too much for my liking. None of this detracts from the book.

Chosen Soldier is a well-paced, informative read that anyone with interest in the military should pick up.

Chosen Soldier by Dick Couch | xecykisypife.tk

Special forces I found this to be very educational however I would to have liked to read more about the physical feats or special forces have to go through in training. I know some things just can't be written about but it was a very summarized book about the training. I would have to give this a marginal rating because I prefer books written with first hand accounts like lone survivor or american sniper. Jun 16, Matt rated it really liked it Shelves: I've read a fair amount of books on special forces now, and this one was unique.

First, it focused on the Green Berets, or Army Special Forces, whom you seem to hear less about these days than Seals or Army Rangers, for some reason. Second, this book took a deep dive into the training methods of the Green Berets, far more than other books I have read. It's amazing the depth of training--physical, technical, tactical, linguistic, cultural, etc.

Lastly, I was very imp I've read a fair amount of books on special forces now, and this one was unique. Lastly, I was very impressed by the unique cultural mission of the Special Forces, by their emphasis upon cross-cultural communication in order to train and work with indigenous groups. This is different than the purely direct action focus of other special force groups. As always, as a leftist I think our military is often sent to serve horrible, neo-colonialist missions, but I cannot help but admire their training, commitment, and never-quit mentality.

Other movements and groups could learn a lot from them. Jun 16, Melly rated it it was amazing. This was a Twitter recommendation, and I am so glad I took it! I am very unfamiliar with military and special forces, and that just made it even more fascinating. It started out a bit slow, with background on special forces in general. It was mildly interesting, but things really got fired up when the author started in on the actual premise of the book - following special forces trainees through their training.

The reading was phenomenal, and thoroughly enjoyed. It's nonfiction, but read a like f This was a Twitter recommendation, and I am so glad I took it! It's nonfiction, but read a like fiction. I felt for those guys, I was so proud of each of their achievements, and was left in awe of their capability to swiftly learn all that they do. A look behind the curtain A thorough and complete visualization of the demanding and complex training our SOF personnel willingly undertake.

These true hero's are a special mix of toughness and compassion to compete their missions. Dec 04, Robert Bowman rated it did not like it. Skip the book, its a slow read and never get better. It reminds me of trying to walk in the ocean. A detailed look into the training of a Green Beret in the Special Forces.

Jul 14, Pat Murray rated it really liked it. I read this because my son is considering going into SF. If he does decide to go into SF at least I'll know what he is talking about when he is in the different phases. Feb 11, Oceana rated it it was ok Shelves: There is a lot of interesting information about the training of special forces soldiers in "Chosen Soldier".

Most of it is rather technical and dry, but if you are doing any research on the subject, the book will undoubtedly be helpful. The problem with the book is more that Couch apparently can't decide if he wants to focus on the technical part of the training or on the people who go through that training in order to become special forces soldiers. Sometimes his descriptions of the training see There is a lot of interesting information about the training of special forces soldiers in "Chosen Soldier". Sometimes his descriptions of the training seem to long and too detailed, sometimes they are not detailed enough, because he choses to introduce one of the participants instead of focusing on his description.

And those introduction are lacking, too. I didn't get the feeling that even one of these guys was brought closer to me, that I understood where they are coming from or going to. Mostly, I felt that I wasn't going to see them again anyway because either they'd leave the program or Couch would Choose not to mention them again for other reasons , so why should I care. And mind you, the actual descriptions of the training aren't even all that good - Couch is so focused on himself that he loses sight of information and structure, and often leaves the reader swimming in the nowhere between too much details and not enough focus.

Or the other way around. If in chapter 4 you still need to point out to the reader that "this [add description of cour choice]" is that "he [the reader]" is going to find in "Chosen Soldier", you need to seriously reconsider the purpose of your introductory chapter. But what I disliked most about the book that couch keeps coming back to himself. And then there is that whole thing where he keeps talking about "our young boys", "our efforts", "our enemy". What is this - a policy book, a personal history or a book about the Making of a Special Forces Warrior?

I'm sorry, but if I had wanted to read a book about Dick Couch, I would have bought one and who knows, I may have wanted to read such a book. As it is, I bought a book about special forces training, not about "Dick Couch and Special Forces training". This book would have profited from a good editor, but I'm guessing Couch has too big a name for his publishers to criticize him too much.

Any why should they, since people obviously buy and like his books, this one included, judging by the reviews here and on Amazon? Using the Nazis as examples for anything good, even something that may have been a well-exercised commando action in Dick's Couch elusive world view, is never a good idea. Yes, they also built the autobahn, but we still don't commend them for that on a daily basis. Trust me on that. If you want to read about Special Forces, but do no need all the technical details of the training, Haney's "Inside Delta Force" is a much better read.

Jun 25, Kevin Goldsmith rated it it was amazing. This is a hands-down enthralling read.


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  • Chosen Soldier: The Making of a Special Forces Warrior by Dick Couch.

This book focuses on the U. Army's Special Forces, also known as the Green Berets. They are an elite bunch who specialize in counterinsurgency and can thrive autonomously from base for an extended a This is a hands-down enthralling read. They are an elite bunch who specialize in counterinsurgency and can thrive autonomously from base for an extended amount of time, whereas other groups such as Army Rangers or Navy SEALs cannot stay out in the field as long.

I found the depth of training covered in this book very satisfying. As of the writing, there are four unique phases during training, culminating in the infamous "Robin Sage" event during Phase IV in the mythical country of Pineland. Candidates must help insurgents rout the corrupt government to establish a new one while being ruthlessly tested and evaluated. I don't want to spoil it, but there is a hilarious instance during this evolution I read that made that passage worth the price of the book. At the end, you come to love and respect the men who sacrifice for our nation and to expend tremendous energy in making the world a freer and safer place.

God bless each and every one of them.


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May 06, C 4Ashen added it. Special force officers must go through many vigorous years of training before getting the honor of being an American Special Forces officer. After the countless hours of work the solder still does more than just fight on the battle field. Becoming one of these warriors means you must do more than just fight the war. Special Forces soldiers have been around for a long time and they have been fighting for our country for many wars.

The lineage of the Special Forces has gone back to the s. Special Forces soldiers should be treated with the highest regard and respect for what they have done for our nation. Feb 20, Jack rated it really liked it Shelves: A really interesting look into the making of special force soldiers. He was, I think, given unprecedented access to Green Beret recruit training, and Couch offers a fine first-person, memoir-like description of all he saw as the recruits arrived at Fort Bragg, NC for what was a grueling training process. What some people are willing to take on for their country is amazing, and to know that there are Americans who already have it all and yet complain that they need tax cuts is pathetic.

Anyway, Couch did a great job and offered a valuable window into the tip of the spear of American efforts to defeat terrorism. Jan 04, Dalton added it.

The Making of a Special Forces Warrior

Noted military author, Dick Couch, has recently penned what must be considered the definitive account of the current grueling process of turning volunteers into highly capable Special Forces operators with the book Chosen Soldier: The Making of a Special Forces Warrior. I was slightly disappointed by the subtle change in passion from the author relative to his previous works on SEAL training i. As a former Marine, I have been very impressed by Mr. Apr 07, 4Campbell J added it. In this book, Dick Couch, a former Navy Seal gives an in depth description and story of what it takes to become a Navy Seal.

From there the numbers go down until they have the ones who can withstand the hardships and challenges you have to go through. There are plenty of different kinds of stories Couch tells as these are true stories from when he was a Navy Seal.

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I recommend this book to anyone who likes a good adventure. It walks you all the way through the process of becoming a Navy Seal, and even more. I have gained so much knowledge myself from reading this book not only about the Navy Seals, but about the author, Couch himself and i thought it was very interesting. May 17, Mark rated it really liked it. The author gave a good representation of what it takes, both physically and mentally, to get through. The extent of the training is impressive and the hints at how the Special Forces are used in the real world today is very interesting.

The tone of the book is straight forward observations on the part of the author, there is no Tom Clancy type of embellishment which, I think, is how it should be. There is enough exposure to the men involved to keep it real. The Special Forces are the tip of the spear for America and it is somewhat humbling to know that there are such selfless people out there willing to take on that role.

Sep 15, Paul Muller rated it liked it. This book started out very well. I enjoyed learning about the process of creating a Green Beret. As some others have stated, the dialogue did seem a little too polished and unnatural, which was distracting. The second part of the book seemed to be bogged down with details that detracted from the overall impact of the book. It could be that I am going through the Army Staff College right now and the last thing I wanted to do was read about the military decision making process, but I felt that the This book started out very well.

It could be that I am going through the Army Staff College right now and the last thing I wanted to do was read about the military decision making process, but I felt that the second half of the book dragged on from the description of the individual specialty training onward. Overall it was solid, but started better than it finished. Jan 25, Julie rated it really liked it. Not sure what other people expected, but I liked it. I enjoyed how the author mixed the technical and the personal. You could tell he had respect for and felt brotherhood with these men.

It had some of the best quotes! I also realized early on that I was going to have to take notes because he gave me so many things I wanted to know more about. Their lifetime commit Not sure what other people expected, but I liked it. In combating terror, America can no longer depend on its conventional military superiority and the use of sophisticated technology. Following the experiences of one class of soldiers as they endure this physically and mentally exhausting ordeal, Couch spells out in fascinating detail the demanding selection process and grueling field exercises, the high-level technical training and intensive language courses, and the simulated battle problems that test everything from how well SF candidates gather operational intelligence to their skills at negotiating with volatile, often hostile, local leaders.

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IN combating terror, America can no longer depend on its conventional military superiority and the use of sophisticated technology. We are fighting guerrilla wars, against insurgents hidden in remote regions, often deep among the local population. In battles such as these, squadrons of billion-dollar bombers and naval fleets mean much less than on-the-ground intelligence and the ability to organize local forces. Each year, several thousand enlisted men and several hundred officers volunteer for Special Forces training; less than a quarter of those who apply will complete the course.

Chosen Soldier spells out in fascinating detail the arduous regimen these men undergo—the demanding selection process and grueling field exercises, the high-level technical training and intensive language courses, and the simulated battle problems that test everything from how well they gather operational intelligence to their skills at negotiating with volatile, often hostile, local leaders.

They must not only be experts in such fields as explosives, communications, engineering, and field medicine, but also be able to teach those skills to others. Each and every Green Beret must function as tactical combat leader, negotiator, teacher, drill sergeant, and diplomat. These tasks require more than just physical prowess; they require a unique mix of character, intelligence, language skills, and—most of all—adaptability. From the Hardcover edition. Dick Couch is the author of The Warrior Elite: Chosen Soldier should be read by every American who despairs of finding solutions to current tumult.

Couch brings the reader inside the arduous process that makes the Green Beret the Olympic-class soldier: More accurately and revealingly than any author in recent memory, Couch shows how the finest warriors in the world are selected and trained. Chosen Soldier is a great portrayal of the heroes that defend America. Woulfe, author of Into the Crucible: