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My Rosicrucian Adventure Israel Regardie. From Akhenaten to Moses Jan Assman. A Very Short Introduction Dr. Historical Atlas of Hasidism Marcin Wodzinski. First, I initially found it difficult to follow how Shaw was using the terms indigenization, inculturation, and contextualization pp. Over the course of the last half century, missiologists have begun to use contextualization to represent all three concepts and typically the terms refer to deliberate mission praxis.

Shaw appears to be using the three terms to describe the outcomes and realities of revivals.

While he has clearly defined how he is using them and employs these meanings consistently throughout the book, I am still not convinced that these are the best terms to use, especially in light of how they are used differently in missiological literature. Finally, I think the book could have used a few more chapters devoted to other 20th century revival movements.

A European example is noticeably missing. Though the Welsh revivals were alluded to a few times, I think that a dedicated chapter on this movement would have strengthened the book. Some discussion of Filipino Christianity and the revivals among the Kabyle Berber people Algeria would have also been welcomed. In summary, Shaw has proposed an important thesis and supported it ably. Professors and students of global Christianity, intercultural studies, and evangelism will certainly want to read this, while professors and research advisers would do well to add this resource to their syllabi and suggested reading list.

I think also pastors would find the narratives inspiring and even useful illustrative aids in preaching. We need to visit the scene of the action. We need to sift through the ruins of the recent past to reconstruct these mighty movements. He does a great job of sharing his understanding of revival and the forces and dynamics that bring it about, shape it, identify it and result from it.

What are we called to?

Featured: GLOBAL AWAKENING by Mark Shaw [Vol. 3, #25] | The Englewood Review of Books

How do we think outside our little cultural box and remember that the kingdom may look a little different in other places than here? Three things that he specifically mentions in his discussion of revival struck a chord with me. One is that true revival results in greater vision. A second dynamic he mentions is radical community. True revival brings a sense of connectedness and dependence on our brothers and sisters. We are called to be part of a story — part of a work that has been going on since the beginning of time — not a lone ranger building our own little Christian following and kingdom.

Third, the author states that: It is so very true of me.

Many of us here at Englewood Church are making attempts at correcting that. There has been a strong and renewed sense of our selfishness and self-centeredness as a people and our failure to truly be the people of God.