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Page 1 of 1 Start Over Page 1 of 1. Kids In The House. The video content is inappropriate. The video content is misleading. The ad is too long. The ad does not play. The ad does not inform my purchase. The video does not play. There is too much buffering. The audio is poor or missing. Video is unrelated to the product. Please fill out the copyright form to register a complaint. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Very common sense view point.

Not quite what I expected but I am enjoying it anyway.

Mean Moms Rule: Why Doing the Hard Stuff Now Creates Good Kids Later by Denise Schipani

I thought it would be more of a "book" but the outline-like quick read format is nice too. My son got a kick out of the title and was convinced I was going to become a "Mean Mom". I wouldn't use the free shipping again - took a long time to arrive and the second book I ordered at the same time has never arrived!

I was excited to recieve this book and read it all in an hour, not because it was so good but because it was large print on half full pages, not alot of meat to it.

Mean Mom Rules by the Pool

I was hoping to find some riveting new advice and tips on parenting but instead found the idea's to be similar to other things i've read. This book didn't really tell me anything I didn't already know. I would have liked to see more examples of what to do in certain situations. I love this book! It's simple, direct and common sense. Not only does it provide some great thoughts and ideas, but the author provides some fun stories that help you feel supported in your parenting and figure out how to apply the ideas to your own life.

Her approach is down to earth and friendly. See all 4 reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.


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Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. The Mom's Rule Book. Set up a giveaway. Feedback If you need help or have a question for Customer Service, contact us. Would you like to report poor quality or formatting in this book? Once I got past that her approach to kids growing up into people is great. She even mentions her hatred of vending machines in her public library, which I wholeheartedly endorse.

Also a chapter to slowing things down, not rushing people into things they aren't ready for. The ninth chapter, Fail Your Child, a Little Bit, Every Day is probably the most valuable for me - as people are not that into accepting failure nowadays. Get ready because it happens, and Schipani encourages parents to help people grow on their own. Recommended for parents, or in my case, teen services librarians. This book helps me realize why I feel torn between doing the hard thing, or the easier thing.

Or the seemingly easier, less complaint generating route. Which if I bindly take, makes me feel crappy later. Apr 13, Sarah rated it it was amazing Shelves: Denise Schipani is a proud Mean Mom, but really she's only mean in the fact that she's a bit old-fashioned. She doesn't give her kids every single thing they ask for. She doesn't sign them up for every single activity that exists, and she requires them to do chores and holds them responsible for their actions didn't finish your homework on time - no she will not make an excuse to your teacher. But she still gives her kids presents; they still participate in activities; she still takes them out Denise Schipani is a proud Mean Mom, but really she's only mean in the fact that she's a bit old-fashioned.

But she still gives her kids presents; they still participate in activities; she still takes them out for ice cream and on vacation, just maybe not as often or as lavishly as their friends' parents do. I've been a big fan ever since I stumbled onto her site: I agreed with her 10 Mean Mom Manifesto's and after reading them all felt much more reassured in my instincts to set boundaries for my kids and encourage them to learn skills for themselves, and, basically, to not hover quite so much.

I'm sure her approach is too strict for some, but like her, I had slightly stricter than average parents, and looking back now I think that was only a good thing. May 28, Allison Herman rated it really liked it. I skimmed this book, picking and choosing the chapters I was interested in learning from.

I love how straight forward the author is! No nonsense tips from someone who has lived it is exactly the kind of advice I can get behind. She doesn't disparage mothers who disagree with her ideology, which I respect. Because she is spot-on and the others are wrong! In all seriousness, the idea that disciplining our children now to turn them into better adults later makes so much sense. Kids need to learn re I skimmed this book, picking and choosing the chapters I was interested in learning from.

Kids need to learn respect, and limits, at a young age. If we teach them now, disregarding how it makes us moms feel "mean", we will reap the benefits, along with society. There is no reason to go overboard in giving to our children. One time turns into two times turns into ten. Children then come to expect us to buckle.

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As the adult in the relationship, we need to be the heavy. This book can teach you how to do that, do it well, and do it with humor. Sep 04, Gina rated it really liked it. This book was great. I admit to being a bit of a pushover when it comes to being a mom. This book had some wonderful insight on that, and how to get out of the habit. Now, I never gave in and let him have treats when it wasn't the time. I never let him have something he wasn't supposed to have when he was a toddler. I did allow him to play video games that he shouldn't have recently, though.

We, as parents, have to stop thinking that we need to be our child's friend, and realize that we are thei This book was great. We, as parents, have to stop thinking that we need to be our child's friend, and realize that we are their guides to life, instead. We must not give in, ever. We must be a good example always. We must not hover over our children to the point where they can't make it on their own.

It is our job to teach kids the skills they need to survive in the great big world, and than let them go. That's just some of the things Ms. Schipani drives home in her book. I've learned a lot, and I'll try to be a fun, but mean, mom from now on. Jul 17, Holly rated it liked it.

I love her message The three is for the so-so writing. I found myself cheering and shouting, "Yes! Loved the part about sippy cups My philosophy, "Never do anything for your child that he can do for himself" really fits in with that chapter. The chapter on saying "no" was a refreshing reassurance that we are in charge and we c I love her message The chapter on saying "no" was a refreshing reassurance that we are in charge and we can and should say no.

We should save our yeses for when it will really matter. Here are the 10 principles she explores: It's not about you. Hang on to yourself. Start as you mean to go on. Don't follow the parenting pack.

Mean Moms Club: The Moms Rule Book

Take or take back control. Teach them life skills. Fail your child, a little bit, every day. Prepare them for the world, not the world for them. Mar 26, Lisa rated it really liked it. My kids saw me reading this book and got worried. Certainly Strict Moms Rule isn't as catchy of a title, but it more clearly captures what the author advocates with her Mean Mom strategies. The book is organized into "manifestos" i. Repeat as Necessary" - my favorite! Kids can be the most important people in your life, but they do not have to be the laser-beam focus of the family.

The author has a lively and engaging style that makes for easy reading. Oct 09, Diane rated it really liked it. Although I didn't like her writing style a lot of her points hit home for me. I often feel like what is the 'norm' for what we all do with our kids is totally nuts. I am talking hand held electronics, no responsibility to do anything on their own EVER and too many extra circular activities!

I don't want to follow the pack and I want my kids to behave and listen to what I say just because I am the one who said it. This book has made it easier to follow my instinct and do what is right for myself Although I didn't like her writing style a lot of her points hit home for me. This book has made it easier to follow my instinct and do what is right for myself and them. Her book will rub many the wrong way but at the same time someone has to say it!

Trying to get my husband to read it too. May 01, Amanda rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book is great for people who don't know what kind of parents they want to be they should be this kind, hands down or to the parents who think they are being "too hard" on their kids, or that OTHER people are being too hard on their poor little kids.


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You're not teaching your kids to be productive unselfish world inhabitants. Teach your children how to do housework, so they can do it when they are adults. Teach them how to respect themselves and others, before they become a This book is great for people who don't know what kind of parents they want to be they should be this kind, hands down or to the parents who think they are being "too hard" on their kids, or that OTHER people are being too hard on their poor little kids.

Teach them how to respect themselves and others, before they become adults and think they can do whatever they want. Don't spoil your kids, it does them no good, and it just makes you feel better for a very short time anyway. Nov 18, Merri Su rated it it was ok Shelves: I liked the basic premise of the book, which is to take the long view and remember that our goal is to raise responsible, kind, independent adults.

I didn't care for the repetitive nature of the book, the lack of data, the judgmental tone, or the overused question mark though this last one is just a personal pet peeve of mine with reading too many blogs and too much Facebook; e. I really hate that. May 14, Jana rated it it was ok. I'm still on the fence about this book While I find the content helpful I suppose, I'm sitting here thinking, "This isn't revolutionary.

This is common sense. Why am I spending my time reading this? Mar 08, Sandra rated it it was amazing. I just re-read this book, and it's even better than the first time. Level-headed parenting at its best. Should be given out to every mother-to-be and every existing parent, frankly. Dec 05, Laura rated it it was amazing. This is the best book for new moms to read around months.

Mean Moms Rule: Why Doing the Hard Stuff Now Creates Good Kids Later

It cured me of my 'helicopter mom' tendencies that were starting to emerge, and reassured me that it is ok to say NO. My son is now 6. Jul 09, Ally rated it it was amazing. I loved this book, clearly. I must point out though, that I had been looking for a book like this in the past only to find, well, the opposite views in the real and virtual stacks labeled "Family and Relationships" or "Parenting". I had actually given up looking and forged my own mean mom method.

So when I came across Ms. Schipani's book, I found it a refreshing departure from the others I had given into reading. Schipani provides an informative and insightful look at a style of parenting and li I loved this book, clearly. Schipani provides an informative and insightful look at a style of parenting and living that isn't always disucussed, but spoken of in hushed tones amongst those of us who chose to use the "no" word and let their kids try things on their own instead of doing them for them from the get-go.

She provides a comprehensive explanation of the "method" with real-life examples and personal stories from her own family and those she has seen around her. Without sounding indoctrinating, she provides her Manifesto's with a seriousness surrounded by a light, humorous commentary that made this book an enjoyable as well as informative read.

The central theme of "Prepare your child for the world, not the world for them," hit home with me, I appreciate the sentiement as well as her reminder that, " Schipani and found that her in-depth explanations gave me the fortitude to continue to stand my ground and be the parent, not the best friend to my daughters. Not only do I highly recommend Mean Moms Rule, I may be dropping copies into the mailboxes of quite a few friends and family members. Jun 02, Catherine Gillespie rated it liked it Shelves: The title rather refers to the way that Schipani feels like other parents regard her when she raises her children differently.

I think Schipani is right about the changes in parenting culture — the tendency to compare ourselves to others is much easier in the digital age, and it can be difficult to resist the feeling that we need to keep up with what everyone else seems to be doing. Mean Moms Rule is a good reminder that we can be reasonable in our parenting. Feb 06, Tulsa rated it really liked it Shelves: Indicating "Mean" Mom is a little of a misnomer IMHO since this really is more about actually being a parent rather than friend and setting boundaries and rules.

If that makes me the other and others "mean" than so be it. The author points out that we need to allow for failure We also need to be confident as parents that we are doing what is right and what w Indicating "Mean" Mom is a little of a misnomer IMHO since this really is more about actually being a parent rather than friend and setting boundaries and rules. We also need to be confident as parents that we are doing what is right and what we feel best for our own children. It is not about doing what another parent is doing or making sure your child has everything a peer has so as not to feel left out.

She is NOT advocating or even advising to neglect or emotionally abuse our children; just to stick to our guns and give our kids the opportunity to figure things out, deal with disappointment, etc. As parents, we need to stick to what we want to accomplish as a parent and the associated decisions co-sleep, attachment, formula, breastfeeding, daycare, scheduled naps, etc.

It's the end game independent, self-reliant adults that we need to keep in mind. I absolutely LOVED this book since it made me feel like I wasn't horrible for making my kids take naps, sending them to daycare, saying "no" to candy, etc. I don't need to coddle them to show them that I love them Jul 16, Jennifer Heise rated it it was ok Shelves: This is a great book for someone to read before they have kids, especially if they haven't thought much about what their parenting style will be, I think.

I started reading it as moral support as in my family I'm the mean mom, and it made me feel like I wasn't alone-- for about the first 75 pages. The tips are good, especially the nod to the idea of the "good enough mother" from psychology. The stories aren't bad. The author tries hard not to be judgmental of other people's parenting styles, but This is a great book for someone to read before they have kids, especially if they haven't thought much about what their parenting style will be, I think.

The author tries hard not to be judgmental of other people's parenting styles, but sometimes she does slip. If I read one more time "our mothers didn't have these pressures" or something like it I was going to throw the book across the room. For some things-- like letting kids play outside-- it's true; but for others, like not snacking outside of meals or drinking anything except at the table, it's way off base.

Our mothers-- and their mothers-- had lots of people out there trying tell them how to parent. The messages may have been different, but there were relentless messages. The author is my age, and I can see her falling into the 'things were better when I was young' trap that catches us all at our age. May 24, Heather rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I guess I enjoyed getting some advice, pats on the back, and feeling good for say loved this book I guess I enjoyed getting some advice, pats on the back, and feeling good for saying "no" at the grocery store etc.

If you teach them correctly they become your pals as they mature Sep 02, Lisa rated it really liked it Shelves: This book probably gets an extra star because it aligns philosophically with my own approach to being a mom. My 1 job is to raise my baby into someone who can handle himself in the world. That means not always being popular, I'm sure. My big criticism of this book is that Schipani sets up a straw man approach to motherhood from when her parents were raising her. The straw man is that moms were more independent, weren't receiving lots of criticism and input from external forces about how to appro This book probably gets an extra star because it aligns philosophically with my own approach to being a mom.

The straw man is that moms were more independent, weren't receiving lots of criticism and input from external forces about how to approach child-rearing, etc. I'm not sure if this is because she's generalizing from the type of mom she had, but I think her straw man is mistaken. While there's hyper focus on mommyhood currently, our moms and theirs have had lots of models that they were supposed to live up to.

I need to get input from my own mom about this mom? I don't think it invalidates any of her points; I just don't think it was necessary to the construction of her model for mommyhood. Jun 25, Robyn rated it really liked it. I thought Denise had a light and easy style of writing, she is humorous and well organized. I am not going to say I agree with every word of this book but it helped me to recognize when I am doing things I say are for my children but they are really for me.