Guide Black Cherry Blues (Dave Robicheaux Book 3)

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Compared to Louisiana, Robicheaux thought Montana would be safe--until two Native American activists suddenly go missing. When Robicheaux begins investigating, he is led into the dark world of the Mafia and oil companies. At the same time, someone from his past comes back to haunt him.

Someone who was responsible for Robicheaux's flight from New Orleans--someone who brutally murdered his wife--and now is after young Alafair Read more Read less. Enabled Similar books to Black Cherry Blues: A Novel Dave Robicheaux Book 3. Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Heaven's Prisoners Dave Robicheaux Book 2. A Dave Robicheaux Novel.

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She is the first. There will be more.

16 James Lee Burke Dave Robicheaux Series The Tin Roof Blowdown

A poignant and entertaining love story wrapped in a mystery! Gold medal winner of the IBPA's best new voice: Read the riveting debut thriller from Scott Pratt, the Wall Street Journal and two million copy bestselling author. Product details File Size: Mulholland Books; 1st edition December 15, Publication Date: December 15, Language: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Love Longmire, Pickett, O'Connor? Meet Nick Drake, combat veteran turned wildlife ranger.

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Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention burke lee james louisiana montana descriptions novels mystery writer murder clete main alafair detective orleans descriptive cajun prose action guys. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. For any lover of language, this alone is sufficient reward for reading this third novel in his outstanding Dave Robicheaux series focusing on crime on the margins of Louisiana society.

His narrative writing style commands attention, too. Dave Robicheaux, a twice-wounded junior officer who led a platoon in Vietnam, has left the New Orleans Police Department after an unhappy career as a detective. Her death constantly haunts him. She appears nightly in his dreams, robbing him of sleep. Enter Dixie Lee Pugh, his freshman roommate in college, once a high-flying country music star, now washed-up after five ruined marriages and a stretch in prison for murder. His chance meeting with Robicheaux in a local bar sets in motion a series of increasingly violent events that involve his former partner in the police, the Las Vegas and Reno mob, and threaten both their lives.

The action swings from Louisiana to the oil-fields of Montana, with suspense steadily mounting to a crashing conclusion. For crime and mystery fans who can tolerate over-the-top violence, Black Cherry Blues is a terrific read. James Lee Burke knows how to write a thriller! One person found this helpful 2 people found this helpful.

Enough to go around. I began at the end of the series, and have finally gotten back to the beginning. For readers new to James Lee Burke, it's not an absolute necessity, but for this reader, it make the overall meal much tastier. If you like your Main Characters cut from whole human being cloth, you will not find many who do it better than Mr. Dave Robicheaux is so fully formed, you'll swear you shared a joke with him last week at the bait shop.

The folks he loves, the ones he misses, the ones he wished he was missing, are all equally defined and equally annoying at times. They are all combating scores of personal, very understandable demons and have nevertheless gotten themselves into predictable, poor situations and relationships that serve them anyway but well. The writing is crisp and the plot carries the reader along on one absorbing journey after another. That's another consummate skill of this storyteller -- in a very few words, Burke can transport a reader into a setting so completely you can hear the crickets outside.

If South Louisiana is a favorite destination for you, or also in this case, the Northern Rockies in Montana, you'll find few other writers who can capture the milieu more completely. Up in Montana, Star Drilling is going after hundreds of millions of dollars in oil—only problem is, its under pristine wilderness and the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Shades of Standing Rock. That brings out D 4. All right then, I thought I was making this variation up, but no, there it is on several sites though for sure auto correct is like WTF and has it underlined in red.

Badassness is the state of being badass. Portland actually has a Badassness Map on Vimeo. How would you define badassness? Someone submitted a question: Trust me, this one was seriously good. I love to have girl-fun with my JLB reviews but alongside all that, this is worthy of the praise. Author Ron Hansen wrote: View all 9 comments.

May 31, Paul Nelson rated it really liked it Shelves: Black Cherry Blues is the third in the Dave Robicheaux series and a familiar pattern starts to emerge of a man shoving his nose where it has no place being, that generally puts both his life and everyone close to him in potential jeopardy. Thankfully Robicheaux doesn't fall of the wagon this time, so there's no depressing plummet into alcoholism but he does have some particularly annoying traits. You can't help thinking, your adopted little girl and the couple that run your business when you're Black Cherry Blues is the third in the Dave Robicheaux series and a familiar pattern starts to emerge of a man shoving his nose where it has no place being, that generally puts both his life and everyone close to him in potential jeopardy.

You can't help thinking, your adopted little girl and the couple that run your business when you're off fucking everything up are gonna die, man, reign yourself back in. I guess this is why good old Dave is a character you can't help but get emotionally invested in, whether it be good shit or bad shit, you're in it for the duration. To the story, Dave runs into ex college buddy Dixie Lee Pugh, in a diner. Dixie has problems and soon enough Dave's paying a visit to the hospital, he didn't want to get involved but you know, he might just end up helping the guy.

When he does there's no going back and pretty soon he's up on a murder charge and linked to Dixie's mafia buddies. He makes bond by mortgaging everything he owns and then he's off with his adopted charge, young Alafair, to Montana desperate to prove his innocence. We also have the reintroduction of his old partner now working for the mafia, Clete Purcell and their relationship is yet another reason to draw you into a series that has some remarkably powerful characters.

Mafia, the oil business and an Indian reservation all careen through Dave's life, even an Indian woman and the start of a relationship until the inevitable happens, destiny is a heavy weight on this man's shoulders and shit happens, as they say. There's a lot of depth to the character, you frequently travel back with him to his armed forces days and Vietnam, he sees and speaks with his dead wife, dreams of her. Which reiterates the fact that she died because he was involved in something he really should have avoided but Dave Robicheaux is not someone who turns the other cheek.

It's why bad things follow him relentlessly trying their best to cause him grief. The writing is brilliant as ever, the prose is Southern fried at its most delicious, James Lee Burke paints a scene better than most, his characters are as gripping as a bear hug from the biggest wrestler and he is easily up there with my favourite authors. Also posted at http: View all 3 comments. Apr 02, StoryTellerShannon rated it really liked it Shelves: This novel is best suited for people who like a darkness of human character intertwined with an engaging clue trail amidst melancholy yet beautiful writing.

Robicheaux is back and not too soon. This time around he's recovering from a horrible loss in his family, getting over his binge with alcoholism and wouldn't you know it but the poor guy tries to help an old college friend and gets framed for murder. What's a detective to do? Apparently, drive to Montana with his foster daughter. I'm kidding This novel is best suited for people who like a darkness of human character intertwined with an engaging clue trail amidst melancholy yet beautiful writing.

The clue trail leads that way and so we're off to another state in the Union. Additionally, the head honcho who is responsible for framing Robicheaux is up there as well as an old friend from the first novel. Again I could say a lot more but I'd give spoilers so here are some particular passages I enjoyed which don't give too much away: I think it was my wife. When you use, you lose.

A mean lesson, but when you become involved with an addict or a drunk, you simply become an actor in a script that they've written for you as well as themselves. I can give you a couple of names in Lafayette or St. They must teach it in the convent, I thought. The tied was out, and the jetties were black and stark against the flat gray expanse of the bay and the strips of purple and crimson cloud that had flattened the western horizon. Seagulls dipped and wheeled over the water's edge, and a solitary blue heron stood among the saw grass in an inlet pool, his long body and slender legs like a painting on the air.

If you run into Lois, tell her I'm sorry for ripping her off. I left my toothbrush in the bathroom. I want her to have it. You think being an ex-cop lets you write the rules? Out of the corner of my eye I saw Alafair staring at us with the stunned, empty expression of person wakened from a nightmare. When her leg bumped against me, she smiled awkwardly as though we had been jostled against one another on a bus, then her eyes looked at my face with both expectation and perhaps a moment's fear. I suspected she was one of those whose hearts could be easily hurt, one to whom a casual expression of affection would probably be interpreted as a large personal commitment.

I doubt that a girl of that kind ever existed, but we believed she did, anyway. She reappears to him in his lonely moments, or he sees her in the face of a young girl in the park, buying a snowball under an oak tree by the baseball diamond. But she belongs back there, to somebody else, and that thought sometimes rends your heart in a way that you never share with anyone else. May to January Dave Robicheaux does not know when enough is enough. He keeps sticking his nose in where it doesn't belong and in the process puts those he loves at risk.

He's like a dog with a bone and he will not let go. Sometimes I think the alcohol fried his brain. He may be sober now but he is always one drink away from a drunk. Actually I don't know if he could really be described as sober. He seems to live in a perpetual dry drunk. He may not be that likable as a character, but James Lee Burke's writing m Dave Robicheaux does not know when enough is enough. He may not be that likable as a character, but James Lee Burke's writing makes it all worthwhile. In Black Cherry Blues , Dave gets involved in the business of Dixie Lee Pugh, his freshman college roommate, who went on to be famous in the early days of rock 'n' roll.

Nowadays it seems that wherever Dixie Lee goes, trouble follows and at first Robicheaux doesn't want any part of it. But as it turns out, he can't resist getting involved. In this book he and his daughter, Alafair, follow trouble all the way from Louisiana to Montana. Burke has some of the best descriptive powers of any writer, so much so that you think you're right there. There are a lot of evil people in this world and Dave Robicheaux seems to want to meet them all. It's always black and white with him. I sometimes get frustrated with all the trouble he gets himself into but I keep reading.

James Lee Burke is one of my favorite authors. The first book I read by him was Wayfaring Stranger , a book that I received as an advanced reading copy. That book pulled me in and made me want to read everything he wrote. I have him for my Bookworm-one author challenge.

I'm enjoying the challenge so far. I just wish sometimes that Dave Robicheaux weren't so pig headed. View all 4 comments. Jun 17, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: This book won the Edgar Award in and it is easy to see why. I have read several of the books in the Dave Robicheaux series and this may be my favorite There are few authors that I have encountered who have the ability to set the scene so that you feel like you are actually there.

His descriptions of a bayou, a lake, the mountains, the rain, even the local foods are masterful. As are the characters in his stories. A great story teller in every sense. The love that he and Annie shared is still strong even in death. As is his love for Alafair, the girl he rescued from a plane that crashed in the bayou in Heaven's Prisoners. In this outing you can see the bond between father and daughter.

The smile on Alafair's face or the steps Dave will take to protect her. There are moments of comical relief such as when he constantly corrects her grammar Alafair has apparently picked up some Cajun since the last novel. Maybe from Batist who works for Dave in his bait and boat rental business.

The story opens when Robicheaux runs into an old college roommate. Dixie Lee Pugh is a burned out musician. He had a brief taste of success but lost that to drink and drugs. Now he works for a Montana oil business and for a small time wise guy named Sally Dio. He has a problem he would like to talk to Robicheaux about. In very short time Dixie Lee's problem becomes Robicheaux's problem. Robicheaux finds himself framed for murder and the only way to clear himself and stop from being sent to Angola prison is to go to Montana and find the person who framed him.

This is a story of a land-hungry oil company, the Mafia, and American Indian activists. Dave Robicheaux is a very complex character. He is haunted by the memories of his mother who left the family when he was a boy, the untimely death of his father on an oil rig in the Gulf, his military service in Vietnam, his alcoholism, and of the murder of Annie who he could not save. He is not always easy to like but overall you can forgive these flaws for his just being human and dealing with life the best way he can.

Sep 21, Bob rated it really liked it. Finally, a modern author who isn't afraid to take his time and use language as it is meant to be used in a novel! Patterson tells a hell of a story But she belongs to back there, to somebody else, and tha Finally, a modern author who isn't afraid to take his time and use language as it is meant to be used in a novel! But she belongs to back there, to somebody else, and that thought sometimes rends your heart in a way that you never share with anyone else. Feb 02, Cathy DuPont rated it it was amazing Shelves: Must check it out but thought this was the first in the series, and I hope so because just read something which said, 'it just keeps getting better.

The characters were described with clarity, Wow! The characters were described with clarity, were easy to keep up with and the plot was fantastic. One of the elements I really love though, is the description of the landscape and this was full of wonderful adjectives taking the reader from southern Louisana to Texas and Montana.

The character, Dave Robicheaux, obviously has had his share of sadness and how he responds to trouble is based, in part, to his past experiences which he describes in almost a mystical manner. Just another reason I like Burke's writing. So glad my reader friend Sandy found this one for me. I owe it to her! Gave four stars but waffled I really like everything about this book. Aw, hell, I'm changing it and giving it five stars. I really, really liked it! Just read an article passed to me by Goodreads friend Lynette. By the way, I compared books and there are books we both have read.

It goes without saying that our tastes are definately similar And for those who do not know my and Lynette's favorite genre, it's mysteries; James Burke, T. And I say above, Burke can only get better, and yes, I was right. Dave Robicheaux has only gotten better.

Black Cherry Blues (Dave Robicheaux, #3) by James Lee Burke

Lynette is on her way to read John D. MacDonald who she's never read and I'm on my way to read J. Jance, who I've never read.

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That's what GR friends are for! If I was going to take a class on crime writing I would just give the students this chapter. Everything you need is in there — the characters, the situation, a suggestion of what might happen, what the theme might be — bang, in one short chapter.

Great observations on American crime writers by Ian Rankin. View all 14 comments. James LeeBurke is a master. His writing is vivid, the characters well-drawn, and the plots intriguing. In the meantime Dave chain-whips a bad guy he really should have known better and the guy turns up dead so Dave is facing a murder char Audiobook: In the meantime Dave chain-whips a bad guy he really should have known better and the guy turns up dead so Dave is facing a murder charge. There was something a bit off about this novel. Perhaps it was that Dave was no longer in Louisiana; perhaps it was the -- to my mind -- excessive guilt-ridden self-examination that seems more a plea for forgiveness from others than seeking to understand himself; perhaps it was the excessively slow cadence of the reader who I normally like very much Will Patton ; perhaps it was the implausible plot and would you take your six-year-old daughter on a dangerous mission?

Then again it might have been the outrageous way he solves the case. Personally, had I been the social worker, there is no way I would ever have placed Alifair with Dave given the level of violence with which he surrounds himself. But he does write beautifully. Dec 18, Steven Godin rated it it was amazing Shelves: Burke is a master of crime fiction, with not a weak book in the Dave Robicheaux series is a testament to his skills as a writer. He delves that little bit deeper with his characters, with themes of redemption, family ties, guilt and ghosts from the past, mainly set in a sweltering Louisiana.

In places they don't even feel like crime novels, but rather standard fiction. But when the action does take place he doesn't hold back!. And in Dave's buddy Clete Purcell, we have one of the best supporting Burke is a master of crime fiction, with not a weak book in the Dave Robicheaux series is a testament to his skills as a writer.

And in Dave's buddy Clete Purcell, we have one of the best supporting characters ever!. Black Cherry Blues, the third in the series concerns links to a Great Sioux Reservation and some rather unpleasant gangsters, not as big as his later novels but it still packs a punch. For any crime fan Burke is a must, for my money the earlier novels are his best. I didn't find this one quite as good as the first two but it was close. I'm hooked on this series and I love James Lee Burke. He is a one of a kind writer!

Black Cherry Blues

View all 5 comments. I felt down and depressed until the very end. He does not do strong or smart things to save himself. I was worried and feeling down during most of the book. If the hero is going to be framed, then I want a hero I can root for, feel hope for, and enjoy watching him give it to the bad guys. But this was not. However, I know many readers like this type of fiction. For me at least the ending wa I felt down and depressed until the very end. For me at least the ending was happy, and I really enjoyed the unique phrases and rich descriptions. Dave is a flawed hero. He is smart, but he does reckless and careless things which get him into trouble.

He also did a stupid thing which almost got him killed. And he admitted to himself how stupid it was. I have moments like that. Dave is a former cop, a former alcoholic going to AA meetings. He grieves for his wife who was murdered a year ago. Dave has several sensitive and loving conversations with his dead wife. These are dreams, daydreams, or his imagination. The group of characters are intriguing, interesting, and wonderfully developed - bad guys and good guys. Most of the good guys are flawed. The author used many phrases, metaphors, and similes.


  1. Black Cherry Blues • James Lee Burke!
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  3. Black Cherry Blues (Dave Robicheaux, book 3) by James Lee Burke;
  4. Many I had not heard before. Some I just liked the way he used them. They surprised and delighted me. The two main locations in this story are Louisiana and Montana. The author has homes in both of those places. Mark Hammer was excellent with his timing and interpretations. His southern accent was comfortable to listen to. I loved the way he spoke for the little girl.

    He gave her an attitude that touched my heart. I loved the way she said the word Dave - in such a gentle and caring way. I think there was a problem with the sound equipment. His breaths were noisy and distracting. Number of sex scenes: Aug 31, Harry rated it it was amazing Shelves: In previous reviews of the Dave Robicheaux series 1 and 2 I spoke about having an edge in that I've lived in Southern Louisiana.

    The prose, the descriptions hit me squarely in the gut. I knew what Burke was describing having smelt, tasted and felt that world through recollections of my own. In this book, for the first time I saw Burke as most readers see him I read about a world I'd not visited as Robicheaux visits Montana and thereby could rely only on what I was given to me by Burke.

    It made no difference in my enjoyment. That is the genius of Burke. He can make you be there with Robicheaux, see things through Robicheaux's eyes as if you were seeing it yourself. The first person viewpoint is a great aid in this and as I think about it As with all the novels I've read so far, we continue to delve into the character of Dave Robicheaux. We continue to explore his addictions, his vices, and his determination to not let evil rule his life, but to confront it. Of course, to confront it he must face his greatest fear It is a continuing theme throughout the Robicheaux series.

    I will say that the series continues to deepen, that the Robicheaux series get better as we read more of them. Black Cherry Blues won him the Edgar Award and it is most deserving.

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    Jun 09, Scott rated it it was amazing Shelves: The phrase "genre writer" is a term sometimes used as if it were a venereal disease, and in some cases a deserving critique. Black Cherry Blues is a dazzling story. Burke has created such complex and fully rendered characters that we will overlook the fact that our protagonist Dave Robicheaux is not a very likeable character: I almost pickup a little of John D. MacDonald's c The phrase "genre writer" is a term sometimes used as if it were a venereal disease, and in some cases a deserving critique.

    MacDonald's creation,the wounded but honorable Travis McGee. Burke will have you care about Dave and this cast of characters. I swear that was distilled essence of Ray Bradbury as he describes the fading Fall twilight. Jun 30, Erik Bledsoe rated it really liked it. I often don't follow all the plot twists in mysteries, and this one is no exception.