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Anyways, this was an enjoyable read - mainly just because it was Raymond Chandler, but it was obvious that this was pre-cursory work before he really had the polish onto his stories, and as such they probably lack some of the wordsmithing that makes his novels so excellent. Basically a short story published in novella form. A quick, fun read. I tried to study Chandler's style as I went through it. Very simple, not poetic really. Quite a lot of description of physical locations, but mostly focused on the man-made things in them rather than on the natural world. Jan 18, Kristen rated it it was amazing Shelves: A collection of eight stories not previously reprinted, because Chandler had re-used much of the material in later novels for some reason, he felt compelled to abandon material that had been thus "cannibalized" according to the Introduction.

So readers of his novels will notice extremely familiar elements in many of these stories. Now, Chandler is one of those amazing writers who lies in the background of a lot of later fiction - especially detective fiction - in part because of his material A collection of eight stories not previously reprinted, because Chandler had re-used much of the material in later novels for some reason, he felt compelled to abandon material that had been thus "cannibalized" according to the Introduction. Now, Chandler is one of those amazing writers who lies in the background of a lot of later fiction - especially detective fiction - in part because of his material and in part because of his style.

Very slowly, he writes of one character, his face drained of all expression and became a dead gray mask. Then the man shot himself - rather than kill the two representatives of law and order he'd cornered, when his mission had already gone completely wrong. The Intro notes that Chandler's heroes, flawed though they were, came equipped with a sense of justice that compelled them to help people. That shows strongly in these stories. And then there are the amazing descriptions, and the way he rarely bothered to directly describe how his characters felt.

A desperate criminal points a gun at you - what's the point of describing the protagonist's reaction? But also the lyrical and unexpected descriptions of things and people. Parker probably dreamed of writing like this guy, until he found his own similar but less high-flown voice. Garrison Keillor's Guy Noir is not, I think, a mockery of this style but a way of reveling in it.

It's a joy to read Chandler's work and encounter these clever, sparkling little jewels. Maybe it's not quite the thing, in these postmodern, even more cynical than back then days, but I say: A little poetry won't kill you. Maybe not fair to the book since I picked this up during a reading slump when nothing was really working for me. One of those books that I thought I liked more than I did.

Which is to say, I would read a story, think, "that was pretty good," and then put the book down for four days without ever thinking of picking it up again. It's fine, I guess, just not compelling.

The Brasher Doubloon 1947 Philip Marlowe/Raymond Chandler Novel (Film Noir)

I do have to say for as much as people praise Chandler's prose style, I found it a bit tough to get through. So heavy on the 30's Maybe not fair to the book since I picked this up during a reading slump when nothing was really working for me. So heavy on the 30's slang that I kept being pulled out of the story, and sometimes thrown into confusion, because I had no idea what somebody was talking about. Only read 4 of the 8 stories, which was enough for me to conclude that they're pretty much all the same.

Contains the expected historically-accurate misogyny and racism. Nov 12, Tom rated it liked it Shelves: Marlowe, under different monikers, talks and fights and drives through Los Angeles in a time before history began. Mar 30, Gillian Kevern rated it it was amazing Shelves: Eight short stories, two I'd read before--sort of. The other I might have read as a short story, but I didn't remember all the details.

None of these stories was a let down. They had all the classic Chandler ingredients--the language, the characterisation, and the twists. Am up past my bedtime because I couldn't put the book down. May 07, Matthew rated it really liked it. We often see this on the bonus tracks of music CDs where original drafts of songs have weaker musical riffs and clumsier lyrics than the released track, and we see it in writers who publish first versions of more famous stories that are less polished than the one we have grown to love.

In both cases it is possible that viewing a disappointing work-in-progress will spoil our enjoyment of the final completed version by showing us the haphazard nature of its development. Perhaps that is why Raymond Chandler chose to keep the eight stories in Killer in the Rain under wraps during his lifetime. Nonetheless the stories could not be suppressed indefinitely, and we can now finally read the short stories which Chandler cannibalised so effectively to produce The Big Sleep, Farewell My Lovely, and The Lady in the Lake.

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Killer in the Rain by Raymond Chandler

I will not describe this process in detail, as the Penguin edition provides a helpful introduction which does this. It has a lake, a similar setting and a simple folksy deputy sheriff who is more acute than he looks, but that is all. Curiously the story is perhaps the weakest in this set. These earlier stories are cruder than the novels. The novels may be tough and violent in places, but Chandler refined them from the original stories, which often end in a bloodbath and which dwell unpleasantly on the killings.

Another difference is that the storytelling here is comparatively clipped and concise. This reflects the fact that they were written as short stories and needed to cram far more incident into fewer words. In the novels, Chandler has time to draw the passages out — the descriptions and the dialogue — and allow them greater richness and flavour. However many of the elements of the mature Chandler are already in place. The stories are tough and gritty, but find time to stop and express a poetic sensitivity.

The dialogue is sharp and peppered with slang, and the characters are hardened people who talk roughly, even when they have a liking for one another. Criminals are seedy, police officers are suspicious and sometimes corrupt, and doctors are dope peddlers. Deceptively simple cases searching for a missing woman, trying to recover stolen jewellery etc always prove to have far more to them, and our hero is soon dragged into investigating multiple murders. The stories are also united by the presence of a private eye hero who narrates them.

This private eye is a hardened investigator, used to dealing with violent thugs, touchy clients and hostile police officers. However, he is never hard, and much of his investigative work is not even done for money. It often involves stepping in to try to right injustices and protect the innocents. The ingenuity with which Chandler converted these stories into novels is impressive. For the novels, Chandler lifted dialogue and descriptions.

He put characters from these stories into a far more complex narrative, sometimes combining characters, and changing their names. He even altered the role of the characters in the novels, so that it is sometimes a shock for the reader to discover that the original of the novelised character was actually a crook, or met with a different fate to the one that we saw in the novel.

However if Chandler had not put these first thoughts onto the page, then he would not have had the material for his novels, and I am grateful that they were written. They suffer a little from comparison with their future use, but they had many of the components of a great story. Aug 09, Maureen rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Including the story in the title, there are eight short stories in this collection. Ray Chandler had an ear for dialogue, and a talent for description that grab the reader by the throat and march him off into shamus territory.

Consider this little randomly-chosen gem: We stood looking at each other inside.

Killer in the Rain (Phillip Marlowe) -- Paperback / softback [Paperback]

She dropped her hand slowly an Including the story in the title, there are eight short stories in this collection. She dropped her hand slowly and tried to smile. Then all expression went out of her white face and it looked as intelligent as the bottom of a shoe box. Killer in the Rain was an enjoyable piece of detective fiction. It was certainly not what one would term a whodunnit; its attention to the more sordid aspects of crime and its lacking in whimsicality separated it quite distinctly from an Agatha Christie-style mystery.

The plot was cogent and I enjoyed reading it, but although its weary, melancholy style had some appeal, I never felt truly entertained or excited by the story. The lack of humour accentuated this. In short, Killer in the Rain was a Killer in the Rain was an enjoyable piece of detective fiction. In short, Killer in the Rain was a good novella, but not one that I would fervently recommend to others. Early short story but it still has plenty of Chandler magic. He tore it open carelessly and got out a wallet that was not quite as big as a bale of hay.

There is the merest of a lean to the HB otherwise no other marks. Cloud 9 Books Condition: Collection of eight stories which first appeared in the pages of pulp magazines like Black Mask, Dime Detective, and Detective Story Magazine. Octavo; blue cloth, with titles stamped in white on spine and front cover; dustjacket; pp.

A few faint spots to top edge and front endpaper, else a tight, Near Fine copy. Lorne Bair Rare Books Published: First Edition 1st Printing. Blue Cloth Stamped In White. Arroyo Seco Books Published: Fine with Near Fine Dust Jacket one small tear on back cover. Protected in archival plastic. Contains 8 Chandler stories, including the title story.

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Chandler called his early stories "cannibalized" work since later in life he sometimes used episodes and characters from them in the full-length novels which made his name. Ships same or next business day. Bound in the publishers fine weave two tone blue boards with contrasting white title lettering to spine and front board. This is the first American edition of the collection of eight short stories from which sprang the infamous sleuth Philip Marlowe.

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Much of the material within these short stories formed the basis for Raymond Chandlers first four novels. The pages remain in fresh, clean condition with no inscriptions and are tightly bound. Book sits solid and square with all hinges strong. A sharp presentable book inside and out.

Housed in the Rob Howard designed atmospheric dustwrapper with publishers printed price intact on front inside flap. Light overall wear and rubbing mainly to the edges otherwise the dustwrapper is in very good condition. Protected in a removable archival booksleeve to preserve its condition.

Photographs of the book and the dustwrapper are available on request. Within these stories one finds suspense, violence and tragedy in a big city called Los Angeles. A very nice copy of an absorbing collection of Raymond Chandler short stories.. The Rare Book Shelf Published: Killer in the Rain Raymond Chandler Ships with Tracking Number! May not contain Access Codes or Supplements. Buy with confidence, excellent customer service! Good-looking copy of the true first edition of this title preceding the Houghton, Mifflin American edition , a posthumous collection of eight early stories that the author referred to as his "cannibalized" work, by which he meant "that in later life he sometimes used episodes and characters from them in the full-length novels which made him famous.

Spine a shade darker, faint dime-sized stain on rear board, owner's name neatly penned on front fly, still very good, lacking the dustwrapper. Eight early stories which originally appeared in Black Mask and Dime Detective, and which were adapted into the first four Philip Marlowe novels.


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Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. Fine in Very Good dust jacket. Fine in Very Good dust jacket Edition: Or red cloth, titled in gilt to spine, in jacket. Jacket price clipped with some foxing, spine very slightly sunned. Some minor foxing to endpapers, page edges and margins of a few pages. Eight early stories by Raymond Chandler which he refered to as his 'cannibalised stories'- meaning that in later life he sometimes used episodes and characters from them in the full length novels that made him famous. Most of the stories first appeared in Black Mask magazine, but this was their first UK appearance.

First US edition, fine in a very good dust jacket. The jacket has a few small chips at edges, and a little wear at stress points. There is also a tape repair on the unprinted side of the front flap fold. A collection of eight stories previously unpublished in book form, most from early pulp magazines, and which contained the seeds of his early novels.

The book is tight and clean, with no names or other markings. Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket. Blue cloth titled in white. She dropped her hand slowly and tried to smile. Then all expression went out of her white face and it looked as intelligent as the bottom of a shoe box I lit my cigarette, puffed it slowly for a moment and then asked: What are you doing here?

Before creating Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler perfected the hardboiled private detective story in the pages of Blask Mask magazine tough, spare tales of gumshoes and murder, laced with a weary lyricism and deadpan, laconic wit. Eight 8 short stories; L.