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ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. East Dane Designer Men's Fashion. Jurisdiction Ratione Personae or the personal reach of the courts jurisdiction". Retrieved 19 September To Theo van Gogh. The Hague, on or about Tuesday, 16 May Praeparatio Evangelica Preparation for the Gospel. Gifford - Book 6". Retrieved 21 June Retrieved 10 September Archived February 3, , at the Wayback Machine. Latin for the Illiterati. Retrieved from " https: Lists of Latin phrases. Articles with Project Gutenberg links CS1 maint: Julian—Gregorian uncertainty CS1 German-language sources de Webarchive template wayback links All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from June Interlanguage link template link number Articles containing French-language text Articles containing Italian-language text Articles containing explicitly cited English-language text Articles with unsourced statements from June Articles with unsourced statements from November Articles with unsourced statements from September Articles containing Hebrew-language text Articles with unsourced statements from January Views Read Edit View history.

In other projects Wikimedia Commons. This page was last edited on 2 September , at By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. From general to particular; "What holds for all X also holds for one particular X. A solis ortu usque ad occasum. Said of an argument either for a conclusion that rests on the alleged absurdity of an opponent's argument cf. The phrase is distinct from reductio ad absurdum , which is usually a valid logical argument. Literally, "from the everlasting", "from eternity", and "from outside of time".

Philosophically and theologically, it indicates something, e. Sometimes the phrase is used incorrectly to denote "from time immemorial", "since the beginning of time", or "from an infinitely remote time in the past", i. Or, "at will" or "at one's pleasure". Regarding or pertaining to correspondence; [1] secretarial office in the Roman Empire. Legal term denoting derivation from an external source, rather than from a person's self or mind, this latter source being denoted by "ab intra". Or "from the bottom of my heart", "with deepest affection", or "sincerely".

Attributed to Julius Caesar. New Latin for "based on unsuitability", "from inconvenience", or "from hardship". An argumentum ab inconvenienti is one based on the difficulties involved in pursuing a line of reasoning, and is thus a form of appeal to consequences.

The phrase refers to the legal principle that an argument from inconvenience has great weight. Thus, "from the beginning" or "from infancy". Incunabula is commonly used in English to refer to the earliest stage or origin of something, and especially to copies of books that predate the spread of the printing press circa AD Or, "from the outset", referring to an inquiry or investigation. In literature, it refers to a story told from the beginning rather than " in medias res " "from the middle". In law , it refers to a thing being true from its beginning or from the instant of the act, rather than from when the court declared it so.

An annulment is a judicial declaration of the invalidity or nullity of a marriage ab initio ; i. In science, the phrase refers to the first principles. In other contexts, it often refers to beginner or training courses. From a decedent, i. Or, "by an angry person"; used in law to describe a decision or action that is detrimental to those whom it affects and is motivated by hatred or anger instead of reason. The form irato is masculine; however, this does not limit the application of the phrase to men: From the origin, beginning, source, or commencement; i.

It is the source of the word aboriginal. From Horace , Satire , 1. Means "from beginning to end", based on the Roman main meal typically beginning with an egg dish and ending with fruit; cf. Thus, ab ovo means "from the beginning", and can connote thoroughness. Expresses the wish that no insult or injury be presumed or done by the speaker's words, i. Also rendered absit iniuria verbis "let injury be absent from these words". Contrast with absit invidia. Said in the context of a statement of excellence: Contrast it with absit iniuria verbis. An explanation of Livy's usage.

Or, "let this not be a bad omen". Expresses the wish that something seemingly ill-boding does not turn out to be an omen for future events, and calls on Divine protection against evil. Legal term pronounced by a judge to acquit a defendant following his trial. Te absolvo or absolvo te , translated, "I forgive you", said by Roman Catholic priests during the Sacrament of Confession , in Latin prior to the Second Vatican Council and in vernacular thereafter. From Virgil , Aeneid , Book 2, Refers to situations where a single example or observation indicates a general or universal truth.

Visible in the court of the character King Silas in the American television series Kings. Or, "from the founding of Rome ", which occurred in BC, according to Livy 's count. It was used as a referential year in ancient Rome from which subsequent years were calculated, prior to being replaced by other dating conventions. Also anno urbis conditae a. Or, "from Heaven all the way to the center of the Earth". In law, it may refer to the proprietary principle of Cuius est solum, eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos "Whosesoever is the soil, it is his up to the sky and down to the depths [of the Earth]".

From top to bottom; all the way through; or from head to toe; see also a pedibus usque ad caput. Legal principle denoting that an accused person is entitled to plead not guilty, and that a witness is not obligated to respond or submit a document that would incriminate himself. A similar phrase is nemo tenetur se ipsum accusare "no one is bound to accuse himself".

See right to silence. Equivalent to "on the contrary" and " au contraire ". An argumentum a contrario "argument from the contrary" is an argument or proof by contrast or direct opposite. Ovid , Tristia , 1. Common ending to ancient Roman comedies; Suetonius claimed in The Twelve Caesars that these were the last words of Augustus ; Sibelius applied them to the third movement of his String Quartet No.

Also used in the singular preceding a saint's name: Acta Sancti "Deeds of Saint" N. Legal principle of the presumption of mens rea in a crime. The actual crime that is committed, as distinguished from the intent, thinking, and rationalizing that procured the criminal act; the external elements of a crime, as contrasted with the mens rea , i. In logic, to the point of being silly or nonsensical. See also reductio ad absurdum. Not to be confused with ab absurdo "from the absurd".

In legal language, used when providing additional evidence to an already sufficient collection. Also used commonly, as an equivalent of "as if this wasn't enough".

List of Latin phrases (full)

Or, "a rough road leads to the stars", as on the Launch Complex 34 memorial plaque for the astronauts of Apollo 1 ; motto of the State of Kansas and other organisations. To appeal to the masses. Often said of or used by politicians. An argumentum ad captandum is an argument designed to please the crowd. Formal letter or communication in the Christian tradition from a bishop to his clergy.

An "ad clerum" may be an encouragement in a time of celebration or a technical explanation of new regulations or canons. A long time ago; from Gaius Lucilius , Satires , 6, An ad eundem degree , from the Latin ad eundem gradum "to the same step" or "to the same degree" , is a courtesy degree awarded by a university or college to an alumnus of another.

It is not an honorary degree but a recognition of the formal learning for which the degree was earned at another college. Motto of Renaissance humanism and the Protestant Reformation. Said during a generic toast ; equivalent to "bottoms up! Generally means "for this", in the sense of improvised or intended only for a specific, immediate purpose. Or, "at the man". Typically used in argumentum ad hominem , a logical fallacy consisting of criticizing a person when the subject of debate is the person's ideas or argument, on the mistaken assumption that the soundness of an argument is dependent on the qualities of the proponent.

Used to designate a property which repeats in all cases in mathematical proof. Also used in philosophical contexts to mean "repeating in all cases". The Calends were specific days of the Roman calendar , not of the Greek , and so the "Greek Kalends" would never occur. Similar to " when pigs fly ". Loosely, "according to what pleases" or "as you wish"; libitum comes from the past participle of libere , "to please".

It typically indicates in music and theatrical scripts that the performer has the liberty to change or omit something. Ad lib is specifically often used when someone improvises or ignores limitations. Also used by some restaurants in favor of the colloquial "all you can eat or drink".

Legal phrase referring to a party appointed by a court to act in a lawsuit on behalf of another party who is deemed incapable of representing himself. An individual who acts in this capacity is called a guardian ad litem. Bartholomew's School, Newbury, UK. Motto of the Society of Jesus Jesuits. Or, "to the point of disgust". Sometimes used as a humorous alternative to ad infinitum. An argumentum ad nauseam is a logical fallacy whose erroneous proof is proffered by prolonged repetition of the argument, i.


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Thus, "exactly as it is written"; similar to the phrase "to the letter", meaning "to the last detail". Generally precedes "of" and a person's name, and is used to wish for someone to be remembered long after death. More loosely, "considering everything's weight". The abbreviation was historically used by physicians and others to signify that the last prescribed ingredient is to weigh as much as all of the previously mentioned ones.

Meaning "according to the harm" or "in proportion to the harm". The phrase is used in tort law as a measure of damages inflicted, implying that a remedy , if one exists, ought to correspond specifically and only to the damage suffered cf. Loosely "subject to reference": Not the same as a referendum. Motto of the Brazilian Marine Corps. Motto of the Association of Trust Schools. Legal phrase for a writ of entry ad terminum qui praeteriit "for the term which has passed". Said of a work that has been expurgated of offensive or improper parts.

Also rarely "in usum Delphini" "into the use of the Dauphin ". Used in commerce to refer to ad valorem taxes , i. One of the classic definitions of "truth". When the mind has the same form as reality, we think truth. Also found as adaequatio rei et intellectus. Phrase used in epistemology regarding the nature of understanding. Someone who, in the face of a specific argument, voices an argument that he does not necessarily accept, for the sake of argument and discovering the truth by testing the opponent's argument. Confer the term "arguendo".

Horace , Ars Poetica , 7. Often abbreviated to "aetat. Appears on portraits, gravestones, monuments, et cetera. Sometimes shortened to aetatis , aetat. Frequently combined with Anno Domini , giving a date as both the theoretical age of Jesus Christ and the age of the decedent; e. Legal phrase; Cicero , De Finibus , 4. Legal term from "fides" "faith" , originating at least from Medieval Latin to denote a statement under oath. Loosely, "even more so" or "with even stronger reason". Often used to lead from a less certain proposition to a more evident corollary.

More often translated as "do well whatever you do". Literally translated, it means "do what you do"; figuratively it means "keep going, because you are inspired or dedicated to do so". This is the motto of several Roman Catholic schools. It was also used by Pope John XXIII in the sense of "do not be concerned with any other matter than the task in hand"; he was allaying worry of what would become of him in the future: Metaphysical and moral principle that indicates the connection of ontology , obligation , and ethics. Latin translation from John 1: John the Baptist exclaimed "Ecce Agnus Dei!

The original meaning was similar to "the game is afoot", but its modern meaning, like that of the phrase " crossing the Rubicon ", denotes passing the point of no return on a momentous decision and entering into a risky endeavor where the outcome is left to chance. An assumed name or pseudonym ; similar to alter ego , but more specifically referring to a name, not to a "second self". Legal defense where a defendant attempts to show that he was elsewhere at the time a crime was committed. His alibi is sound; he gave evidence that he was in another city on the night of the murder.

Quotation from Isaiah , Or, "nothing is heavy to those who have wings". Motto of the State of Oregon , adopted in ; it replaced the previous state motto of "The Union", which was adopted in Term used for the university one attends or has attended. Another university term, matriculation , is also derived from mater.

The term suggests that the students are "fed" knowledge and taken care of by the university.


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  • The term is also used for a university's traditional school anthem. Another self, a second persona or alias. Can be used to describe different facets or identities of a single character, or different characters who seem representations of the same personality. Often used of a fictional character 's secret identity. De ranis a Iove querentibus regem. Usually attributed to Cicero.

    One of Justinian I 's three basic legal precepts. Graduate or former student of a school, college, or university. Plural of alumnus is alumni male. Plural of alumna is alumnae female. This translation ignores the word usque, which is an emphasis word, so a better translation is probably from sea even unto sea. National motto of Canada. Ennius , as quoted by Cicero in Laelius de Amicitia s.

    An adviser, or a person who can obtain or grant access to the favour of a powerful group, e. In current United States legal usage, an amicus curiae is a third party allowed to submit a legal opinion in the form of an amicus brief to the court. Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas. An obsolete legal phrase signifying the forfeiture of the right of swearing in any court or cause, or to become infamous.

    Nietzscheian alternative world view to that represented by memento mori "remember you must die": Nietzsche believed "amor fati" was more affirmative of life. Virgil , Georgics , 3. Said by Axel Oxenstierna to encourage his son, a delegate to the negotiations that would lead to the Peace of Westphalia , who worried about his ability to hold his own amidst experienced and eminent statesmen and diplomats.

    Used before the anglicized version of a word or name.

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    For example, "Terra Mariae, anglice , Maryland". Also used in such phrases as anno urbis conditae see ab urbe condita , Anno Domini , and anno regni. Abbreviated from Anno Domini Nostri Iesu Christi "in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ" , the predominantly used system for dating years across the world; used with the Gregorian Calendar and based on the perceived year of the birth of Jesus Christ. The years before His birth were formerly signified by a. Or, "he approves our undertakings". Motto on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States and, consequently, on the reverse of the United States one-dollar bill ; in this context the motto refers to God.

    Variation on annus mirabilis , recorded in print from ; [4] notably used in a speech by Queen Elizabeth II to describe what a bad year had been for her. In Classical Latin , this phrase actually means "terrifying year". See also annus terribilis. Used particularly to refer to the years and , during which Isaac Newton made revolutionary inventions and discoveries in calculus, motion, optics and gravitation. Annus Mirabilis is also the title of a poem by John Dryden written in the same year.

    It has since been used to refer to other years, especially to , when Albert Einstein made equally revolutionary discoveries concerning the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, mass-energy equivalence, and the special theory of relativity. See Annus Mirabilis papers.

    Used to describe , the year the Black Death began to afflict Europe. As in status quo ante bellum "as it was before the war" ; commonly used in the Southern United States as antebellum to refer to the period preceding the American Civil War. Medical shorthand for "before meals". Motto of the Christian Brothers College, Adelaide.

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    Said of an expression or term that describes something which existed before the phrase itself was introduced or became common. Alan Turing was a computer scientist ante litteram , since the field of " computer science " was not yet recognized in Turing's day. Used on pharmaceutical prescriptions to denote "before a meal".

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    Less common is post prandium "after lunch". Or, "completely"; similar to the English expressions "from tip to toe" and "from head to toe". Equally a capite ad calcem. See also ab ovo usque ad mala. Also appears on a plaque at Kinshasa train station. Based on observation, i. Used in mathematics and logic to denote something that is known after a proof has been carried out. In philosophy, used to denote something known from experience. Textual notes or a list of other readings relating to a document, especially in a scholarly edition of a text. Presupposed independent of experience; the reverse of a posteriori.

    Used in mathematics and logic to denote something that is known or postulated before a proof has been carried out. In philosophy, used to denote something is supposed without empirical evidence. In everyday speech, it denotes something occurring or being known before the event. Refers to a mixture of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid , thus called because of its ability to dissolve gold.

    Used to refer to various native distilled beverages , such as whisky uisge beatha in Scotland and Ireland, gin in the Netherlands, brandy eau de vie in France, and akvavit in Scandinavia. Desiderius Erasmus , Adagia AD ; meaning "wasted labor". One who prescribes, rules on, or is a recognized authority on matters of social behavior and taste.

    Sometimes found in the singular as arbiter elegantiae "judge of taste". Originally used by Tacitus to refer to the state secrets and unaccountable acts of the Roman imperial government. Motto of the Starobrno Brewery in Brno. An opaque circle around the cornea of the eye, often seen in elderly people. Motto of Victoria University of Manchester. Also "silver coin"; mentioned in the Domesday Book ; signifies bullion or silver uncoined. Or, "for the sake of argument".

    Said when something is done purely in order to discuss a matter or illustrate a point. Or "reasoning", "inference", "appeal", or "proof". The plural is argumenta. An aesthetic ideal that good art should appear natural rather than contrived. Of medieval origin, but often incorrectly attributed to Ovid. Translated into Latin from Baudelaire 's " L'art pour l'art ". Seneca , De Brevitate Vitae , 1. The "art" referred to in the original aphorism was the craft of medicine, which took a lifetime to acquire. Motto of Blackburn Rovers F.

    Award of the Minister of Culture of the Czech Republic for the promotion of the positive reputation of Czech culture abroad. Desiderius Erasmus , Adagia AD ; meaning "an awkward or incompetent individual". Refers to the insurance principle that the indemnity can not be larger than the loss. Refers to the distinction of free will from astrological determinism. Used in bibliography for books, texts, publications, or articles that have more than 3 collaborators. This formula appears in the Latin revised edition of Thomas Hobbes 's Leviathan , book 2, chapter 26, p. Cornelis Jol , [7] in a bid to rally his rebellious captains to fight and conquer the Spanish treasure fleet in Motto of Queensland , Australia.

    From Virgil , Aeneid , Book 10, , where the first word is in the archaic form audentis. Allegedly the last words of Pliny the Elder before he left the docks at Pompeii to rescue people from the eruption of Vesuvius in Often quoted as audaces fortuna iuvat. Motto of Tottenham Hotspur F. Legal principle; also worded as audiatur et altera pars "let the other side be heard also".

    From Horace 's Odes , 2, Refers to the ethical goal of reaching a virtuous middle ground between two sinful extremes. The golden mean concept is common to many philosophers, chiefly Aristotle. From Virgil , Aeneid , Book 3, Later quoted by Seneca as quod non mortalia pectora coges, auri sacra fames "what do not you force mortal hearts [to do], accursed hunger for gold". Common ancient proverb, this version from Terence. It indicates that one is in a dangerous situation where both holding on and letting go could be deadly. A modern version is "to have a tiger by the tail".

    The Southern Lights, an aurora that appears in the Southern Hemisphere. It is less well-known than the Northern Lights aurorea borealis. The Aurora Australis is also the name of an Antarctic icebreaker ship. The Northern Lights, an aurora that appears in the Northern Hemisphere. Title of a distich by Iohannes Christenius — Denotes an absolute aspiration to become the Emperor , or the equivalent supreme magistrate, and nothing else.

    More generally, "all or nothing".

    A personal motto of Cesare Borgia. Charles Chaplin also used the phrase in The Great Dictator to ridicule Hynkel's Chaplin's parody of Hitler ambition for power, but substituted "nulles" for "nihil". It was the first motto of Chile.


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    Or, "do or die" or "no retreat". It refers to the practices that a Greek hoplite would drop his cumbersome shield in order to flee the battlefield, and a slain warrior would be borne home atop his shield. Seneca the Younger , Epistulae morales ad Lucilium , 7: From the full phrase: Said of two situations that can only occur simultaneously: General pledge of victoria aut mors " victory or death ".

    Catullus , Carmen , addressed to his deceased brother. Anthem of Imperium Europa. Ave Imperator, morituri te salutant.

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    A salute and plea for mercy recorded on one occasion by naumachiarii —captives and criminals fated to die fighting during mock naval encounters. Later versions included a variant of "We who are about to die", and this translation is sometimes aided by changing the Latin to nos morituri te salutamus. Roman Catholic prayer of intercession asking St. Mary, the Mother of Jesus Christ to pray for the petitioner.

    Wise only in appearance. From Erasmus 's collection of Adages. The genitive , Beatae Mariae Virginis BMV , occurs often as well, appearing with such words as horae hours , litaniae litanies and officium office. A Beatitude from Matthew 5: Inscription above the entrance to St. Bella, mulier qui hominum allicit et accipit eos per fortis. Latin proverb [ citation needed ]. Originally from Ovid , Heroides She begs him to stay out of danger, but he was in fact the first Greek to die at Troy.

    Also used of the Habsburg marriages of and , written as bella gerant alii, tu felix Austria nube let others wage war; you, happy Austria, marry. Said by King Matthias. A phrase used by Thomas Hobbes to describe the state of nature. A play on " cogito ergo sum ", "I think therefore I am". Medical shorthand for "twice a day". In other words, "well-intentioned", "fairly". In modern contexts, often has connotations of "genuinely" or "sincerely". Bona fides is not the plural which would be bonis fidebus , but the nominative , and means simply "good faith".

    Opposite of mala fide. In law, if a person dying has goods, or good debts, in another diocese or jurisdiction within that province, besides his goods in the diocese where he dies, amounting to a certain minimum value, he is said to have bona notabilia ; in which case, the probat of his will belongs to the archbishop of that province. A jury or assize of countrymen, or good neighbors. United Kingdom legal term for ownerless property that passes to The Crown. Tiberius reportedly said this to his regional commanders, as a warning against taxing the populace excessively.

    Refers to what benefits a society, as opposed to bonum commune hominis , which refers to what is good for an individual. In the film Hot Fuzz , this phrase is chanted by an assembled group of people, in which context it is deliberately similar to another phrase that is repeated throughout the film, which is The Greater Good. Refers to an individual's happiness, which is not "common" in that it serves everyone, but in that individuals tend to be able to find happiness in similar things.

    John of Cornwall ca. It turns out that the original text said in diebus illis magnis plenae in those days there were plenty of great things , which the scribe misread as indie busillis magnis plenae in India there were plenty of large busillis. Tenet insanabile multos scribendi cacoethes , or "the incurable desire or itch for writing affects many". Used by the Romans to describe the aftermath of the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius. Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt. Hexameter by Horace Epistula XI. Political power is limited; it does not include power over grammar.

    The pen is mightier than the sword. An optical device used in drawing, and an ancestor of modern photography. The source of the word camera. Perfectly correct Latin sentence usually reported as funny from modern Italians because the same exact words, in today's dialect of Rome, mean "A black dog eats a beautiful peach" , which has a ridiculously different meaning. Mens eo ipso imago Dei est quo eius capax est , [14] " The mind is the image of God, in that it is capable of Him and can be partaker of Him.

    So aggrandized as to be beyond practical earthly reach or understanding from Virgil 's Aeneid and the shorter form appears in John Locke 's Two Treatises of Government. Originally an alchemical reference to the dead head or worthless residue left over from a reaction. Also used to refer to a freeloader or worthless element. It implies a command to love as Christ loved. Pope Benedict XVI 's third encyclical. An exhortation to live for today. From Horace , Odes I, Carpere refers to plucking of flowers or fruit. The phrase collige virgo rosas has a similar sense.

    An exhortation to make good use of the night, often used when carpe diem , q. The Roman senator Cato the Elder ended every speech after the Second Punic War with ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam , literally "For the rest, I am of the opinion that Carthage is to be destroyed. Spoken aloud in some British public schools by pupils to warn each other of impending authority.

    Earliest written example is in the Satyricon of Petronius, circa 1st century C. The purchaser is responsible for checking whether the goods suit his need. Phrases modeled on this one replace emptor with lector , subscriptor , venditor , utilitor: It is a counter to caveat emptor and suggests that sellers can also be deceived in a market transaction. This forces the seller to take responsibility for the product and discourages sellers from selling products of unreasonable quality. Are you getting left behind?

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    Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. The book has about 10 useful phrases, which I saw in the sample. When I bought the book, the rest of it was all just a dictionary! This is not a very useful book for someone looking to get to know office expressions in Spanish. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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